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Was Coons Infatuated with Liberation Theology Too?

26 Sep

Thanks to President Obama’s 20-year spiritual adviser and pastor, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, most have heard about the Marxist underpinnings of Liberation Theology.  It now appears Coons has had his own unexplained attraction to Liberation Theology as well:

Chris Coons and his support for Black Liberation Theology,” American Thinker, September 25, 2010.

*****UPDATED*****

From the American Spectator (Sept. 20, 2010):

The Republican Establishment and the Left having now made O’Donnell’s actions in her twenties an issue, the question comes round.

What was Chris Coons doing in his twenties?

Answer? He was in Africa volunteering for the South African Council of Churches, a group that holds to the self-same Black Liberation Theology philosophy preached by James Cone and Jeremiah Wright. The philosophy that has at its core the principles of “Marxism dressed up as Christianity.” The philosophy that is at the very heart of the Obama administration and its actions since taking office two years ago. The philosophy that Coons will undoubtedly all-too-eagerly represent if he is elected as an Obama Democrat to the seat once held by Obama Vice President Joe Biden of Delaware.

The Enterprise Blog gives even more insight into the “Marxism dressed up as Christianity” that Coons is attracted to (September 26, 2010):

Just how radical is Cone’s black liberation theology? So extreme that even calling it “liberal” would be a stretch. When I was a teaching fellow at Princeton Seminary, master of divinity students were assigned Cones’ book, God of the Oppressed. Many of these students thought of themselves as liberal theologically. But with few exceptions, even they could not stomach the sheer nuttiness and (frankly) anti-Christian fury of Cone. I concluded that for all but the most radical students, the best antidote to black liberation theology might just be reading Cones in a first semester introduction to theology. Stripped of its religious terminology, in substance it is basically Marxism with a virulent racial emphasis—not soft Fabian or Christian socialism. Marxism.

Coons’ Rhetoric Versus Record: You Shall Know a Tree by Its Fruit

26 Sep
“I’m not a Marxist, I’ve never held Marxist ideas,” [Coons] said. “I believe strongly in the free enterprise system and have worked hard for eight years in one of Delaware’s most innovative, private sector manufacturing firms and have a good and strong working relationship with the private sector as county executive.” (Politico 9/22/10)
Really?  When your TAX policy looks more like a Marxist than a free-marketer…..what does that make you?  Sure, you may have a “strong working relationship with the private sector,” but TAXING to death the private sector of New Castle County is not what we had in mind.

Text of Coons’ “Bearded Marxist” Coming-Out Essay

26 Sep

Having trouble finding Coons’ Bearded-Marxist coming-out essay?  Here you go by way of the Star Ledger:

Anyone can make mistakes as a kid. But O’Donnell’s errors have nothing to do with a theory of governance. Coons’ mistakes do – assuming he even thinks they were mistakes. He sounds in this youthful essay like every adult liberal I know today.

But maybe Coons has grown up and now realizes his past errors. If so he’s got a lot of explaining to do between now and election day. Here’s the essay:

“College is supposed to be a time of change, a time to question our assumption about the world and define our basic values. For me, the transformations of the last few years have been especially acute. I came to Amherst from a fairly sheltered, privileged, and politically conservative background. I campaigned for Reagan in 1980, and spent the summer after freshman year working for Senator Roth (of Kemp-Roth tax-cut fame.) In the fall of 1983, I was a proud founding member of the Amherst College Republicans. In November 1984, I represented the Amherst Democrats in a hotly contested pre-election debate against my former roommates, co-founders and leaders of the Republicans. As the debate progressed it became obvious how unreconcilably different our opinions had become. What caused such a shift in only one year?

I spent the spring of my junior year in Africa on the St. Lawrence Kenya Study Program. Going to Kenya was one of the few real decisions I have made; my friends, family, and professors all advised against it, but I went anyway, My friends now joke that something about Kenya, maybe a strange diet, or the tropical sun, changed my personality; Africa to them seems a catalytic converter that takes in clean-shaven, clear thinking Americans and sends back Bearded Marxists.

The point that others ignore is that I was ready to change. Experiences at Amherst my first two years made me skeptical and uncomfortable with Republicanism, enough so that I wanted to see the Third World for myself to get some perspective on my beliefs. Certainly Kenya provided a needed catalyst; I saw there poverty, and oppression more naked than any in America, and I studied under a bright and eloquent Marxist professor at the University of Nairobi. Nevertheless, it is only too easy to return from Africa glad to be an American and smugly thankful for our wealth and freedom. Instead, Amherst had taught me to question, so in return I questioned Amherst, and America.

When I first arrived at Amherst, I was somewhat of a Republican fanatic. I fit Churchill’s description, namely, that a fanatic is “Someone who can’t change their mind, and won’t change the subject.” While other freshman share care packages from home, I was equally generous with my inherited political opinions giving them to anyone who would listen. It was in this manner that I soon met a creature I had never known before—a Democrat, several of them. Some of the “Leftists” that I met early on were terrifyingly persuasive, although I never admitted that. A few became my friends and provided a constant nagging backdrop of doubt, for which I am now grateful.

More importantly, during sophomore year, several professors challenged the basic assumptions about America and the world relations with which I had grown up. Cultural Anthropology inspired a fascination with other peoples, and undermined the accepted value of progress and the cultural superiority of the West. In examining the role of myths in “primitive” cultures, we also studied the myth of equal opportunity in this country, a myth I had never questioned. A course on the Vietnam War painted in gory detail a picture of horrible failures made possible by American hubris and dogmatism. I came to suspect, through these and other courses, that the ideal of America as “a beacon of freedom and justice, providing hope for the world” was not exactly based in reality. So, I went to Africa, hungry for a break from Amherst and eager to gain some broader political insight from the brutally real world. What do other nations think of us? Can private enterprise and democracy solve the problems of developing nations? Is Marxism an evil ideology, leading millions into totalitarian slavery? These were some of the questions in the back of my mind as I left for Kenya.

What I learned in Africa unsettled me. I saw the deprivation and oppression of the poor and the politically disfavored in a way not possible in the U.S. In Kenya, my position was not at stake; I was not directly benefiting if the underprivileged had little hope of advancement. I lived with the struggling African family for a month and came to know the hardships that they face. What surprised me was the attitude of the elite; I became friends with a very wealthy businessman and his family and heard them reiterate the same beliefs held by many Americans; the poor are poor because they are lazy, slovenly, uneducated. “Kenya is a land of opportunity,” they said, “those who work receive their just reward.” I knew this was not true in the case of many black Kenyans; this story merely served to justify the position of many who had done well only by working for the British colonialists. I realize that Kenya and America are very different, but experiences like this warned me that my own favorite beliefs in the miracles of free enterprise and the boundless opportunity to be had in America might be largely untrue.

When I returned last summer, I traveled all over the East Coast and saw in many ways a different America. Upon arriving at Amherst this fall, I felt like a freshman at an unfamiliar school all over again. Many of the questions raised by my experiences of the last year remained unanswered. I have spent my senior year reexamining my ideas and have returned to loving America, but in the way of one who has realized its faults and failures and still believes in its promise. The greatest value of Amherst for me, then, has been the role it played in allowing me to question, and to think. I had to see the slums of Nairobi before the slums of New York meant anything at all, but with out the experiences of Amherst, I never would have seen either.”

“Coons’ stewardship did to New Castle County what Socialism did for Cuba.”

24 Sep

At least one DE voter is not impressed with Coons’ infatuation with Marxism.  Tom Burgum writes in the Longboat Key News:

Her opponent, Chris Coons, has a bit of explaining to do before Nov. 2. While still young he became a self-proclaimed Marxist after visiting Kenya where, according to him, he learned America was not a very nice country. He overcame his aversion to the Untied States and ultimately became top executive of New Castle County. He was elected in 2004 and said his top priority would be to continue balancing the budget without increasing property taxes.

In 2006, Coons, despite the pledge not to raise taxes, led the charge for a 5 percent raise in property taxes. In 2007, he managed to push through a 17.5 percent raise, and in 2009 he raised property taxes another 25 percent. Coons is nothing if not inventive: He even proposed a tax on people who call 9-1-1 from their cell phones. Coons claims that his call for shared sacrifice restored New Castle to fiscal responsibility. Now, that may be a stretch because in 2009 Coons warned that the county may be headed for bankruptcy.

By all accounts Coons is no longer a Marxist. Still, his stewardship of New Castle County seems to have done for New Castle what Socialism did for Cuba.

Ouch.

Coons and Marx: dabbler or disciple?

24 Sep

We have all heard by now about Coons’ “bearded Marxist” coming out party.  But did Coons’ infatuation with Marx end there?  Apparently not, as reported by World Net Daily:

The Democrat running against Christine O’Donnell for the U.S. Senate seat from Delaware voluntarily audited a class with Marxist activist Cornel West…

…Responding to the ensuing controversy, Coons told CNN, “I am not now, nor have I ever been a Marxist or an enemy of the people of the United States.”

“I’m not a Marxist, I’ve never held Marxist ideas,” he said. “I believe strongly in the free enterprise system … .”

When he returned to the U.S., he worked for the Coalition for the Homeless in New York and audited a course by West at Union Theological Seminary…

…”I audited one class at Union Theological with Cornel West when I was at the Coalition for the Homeless in New York and realized I strongly needed and wanted some grounding in traditions and doctrines of my own faith,” he said…

…West, currently a race-relations instructor at Princeton, is an avowed Marxist and senior member at the Democrat Socialists of America…

…West served as an adviser on Louis Farrakhan’s Million Man March and is a self-described personal friend of the Nation of Islam leader. West authored two books on race with Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr, who was at the center of a recent controversy in which Obama criticized Gates’ treatment by police outside his home after a report of a burglary…

…WND reported West introduced Obama on stage at the fundraiser after first railing against the “racist” criminal-justice system of the “American empire.”…

…From a young age, West proclaimed he admired “the sincere black militancy of Malcolm X, the defiant rage of the Black Panther Party … and the livid black (liberation) theology of James Cone.

Cone’s theology spawned Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama’s controversial pastor for 20 years at the Trinity United Church of Christ. West was a strong defender of Wright when the pastor’s extreme remarks became national news during the presidential campaign….

(read more here)

Chris Coons: ‘I Studied Under A Marxist’

23 Sep

The American Spectator provides more quotes from Coons regarding his Marxist roots:

“The point that others ignore is that I was ready to change. Experiences at Amherst my first two years made me skeptical and uncomfortable with Republicanism…”

“Kenya provided a needed catalyst; …I studied under a bright and eloquent Marxist professor at the University of Nairobi…”

“Some of the ‘Leftists’ that I met were terrifyingly persuasive, although I never admitted that.”

“…several professors challenged the basic assumptions about America and world relations with which I had grown up…and undermined the accepted value of progress and the cultural superiority of the West.”

“I came to suspect…that the ideal of America as ‘a beacon of freedom and justice, providing hope for the world’ was not exactly based on reality.”

“What do other nations think of us? Can private enterprise and democracy solve the problems of developing nations? Is Marxism an evil ideology, leading millions into totalitarian slavery? These were some of the questions in the back of my mind…”

“I realize that Kenya and America are very different, but experiences like this warned me that my own favorite beliefs in the miracles of free enterprise and the boundless opportunities to be had in America might be largely untrue.”

The Bearded Marxist

23 Sep

Emmett Tyrrell JR, founder and editor of the American Spectator, writes in the Washington Times to provide his own introduction to Chris Coons, the Bearded Marxist, and what type of man he chose to be after traveling to Kenya to be discipled by a Marxist professor:

But now Jeffrey Lord of the American Spectator has been scrutinizing her opponent, Democratic candidate Chris Coons. Mr. Lord did not have to go back to Mr. Coons’ high school days. He found quite a lot in Mr. Coons’ infatuation with Marxism, starting in college. Mr. Coons found Marx about the time that large numbers of Marxist polls behind the Iron Curtain gave him up. By the 1990s, even jailers and torturers were forsaking old Karl, but not Mr. Coons…

…Politico reports that as a 21-year-old about to graduate from Amherst, he wrote a piece in the college newspaper that was titled Chris Coons: The Making of a Bearded Marxist.” Apparently there was more to that trip to Africa than he would like voters to recall or than the Post chronicled…

…A course on the Vietnam War also caused [Coons] to “suspect … that the ideal of America as a ‘beacon of freedom and justice, providing hope for the world’ was not exactly based in reality“…

…my own favorite beliefs in the miracles of free enterprise and the boundless opportunities to be had in America were largely untrue.” He found a moral equivalence between Kenya and the United States and became a “beardless Marxist.”

My guess is that he is still a beardless Marxist. Certainly he shows no scruples about keeping his hands off other people’s property. As county executive of New Castle County, Mr. Coons promised voters he would keep taxes down. Once elected, he raised property taxes by 5 percent in 2006, by 17.5 percent in 2007 and by 25 percent in 2009. He loves taxes….

…Mr. Coons apparently did not have to appear on a clown’s show to be indiscreet. He did it in college and in his later work as a goody-goody bore.

More here.